An end to the blame game in divorce?

Amongst lawyers and in the wider public, the well publicised case of Mrs Tini Owens in Owens v Owens shone a light on the difficulties caused by our fault based divorce system.

Under the current law, divorce proceedings can be based on adultery, desertion, unreasonable behaviour, 2 year separation with your spouse’s consent or 5 years separation.

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Don’t lose out on Pensions on Divorce

According to new research by Scottish Widows, 7 in 10 couples fail to consider pensions during divorce proceedings and this leaves women short changed by £5 billion every year, losing out on benefits after the end of their marriage.

Also, of concern is the research’s findings that almost half of women (48%) have no idea what happens to a pension when a couple gets divorced.

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Cohabitation Awareness Week and the Myth of the “Common Law Marriage”

According to the Office for National Statistics latest release on 8 November 2017, there are 3.3 million unmarried couples living together in the UK and this is the fastest growing type of family in the UK.

This week, Resolution – a group of some 6,500 family lawyers committed to the constructive resolution of family disputes and which campaigns for a fairer justice system is shining a light on lack of protection afforded to millions of unmarried couples with Cohabitation Awareness Week.

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Divorce and Financial Remedies – What Amounts to Bad Conduct?

bad conduct

One of the questions I am frequently asked by clients I act for in divorce and financial remedy cases is what type of behaviour amounts to bad conduct. When trying to resolve issues around the financial aspects following a marital breakdown, the first step is for both parties to provide full disclosure of their finances by exchanging a lengthy document called a Form E.

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Divorce – When Unreasonable Behavior Is Not Unreasonable Enough

Divorce Family Blog

Obtaining a divorce is England and Wales is relatively procedural. If you can establish one of five facts, you can lodge a divorce petition with the court. These facts are:

- Adultery

- Unreasonable behavior

- 2 years separation with your spouse’s consent

- Five years separation

- Desertion

Unreasonable behavior is frequently relied on as it is one of two facts (the other being adultery) that entitle grounds for divorce proceedings; once you have reached the conclusion the marriage has broken down – be that through a resolution with time apart or a mutual agreement.

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